Intellectuele oneerlijkheid tijdens verkiezingscampagnes

Het politieke nieuws werd dit weekend gedomineerd door een "uitschuiver" van Jan Jambon, of dat wil men ons doen geloven. In werkelijkheid gaat het om serieuze uitschuivers van CD&V en SP.a. Aan wie die uitschuivers stemmen zullen kosten, hangt in de eerste plaats af van de intelligentie van de kiezer.

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Fragment uit "Het Muiderslot" (Maarten 't Hart)

Overgenomen uit Maarten 't Hart, "Verzamelde verhalen" pagina 767-768:

Ik heb eerst in Wageningen bosbouw gestudeerd, maar ik heb mijn studie niet afgemaakt omdat ik de kans kreeg naar Venezuela te gaan. Daar heb ik een paar maanden met de autochtonen hout gehakt. Elke dag trok ik met veertig autochtonen het oerwoud in. Ze liepen op blote voeten en gemiddeld trapte er één op zo'n piepklein mosgroen slangetje dat dan meteen beet.

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Columns en social media

Vorige week verscheen er een column van me in Datanews, en ik merkte dat daar wel wat reactie op kwam. Omdat ik niet echt weet wat de impact is van zo'n column, besloot ik eens te kijken naar de social media metrics die op de Datanews site zelf te zien zijn voor wat de 5 recentse columns betreft:

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Google Analytics — April 2014

As predicted a month ago, we didn't break any Google Analytics records in April. We had the Easter holidays and the eve of another holiday (the first of May is Labor day in many countries) and that shows in the number of visits on the site:

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I've been Driesed ;-)

Every month, I download a report about the Google Analytics results of itextpdf.com. At the same time, I also process the analytics page for the lowagie.com site, but I hardly ever report about those results, because I don't have that much time to blog anymore (lowagie.com isn't that relevant anymore now that iText moved to itextpdf.com). However, when making the overview of the visits (now called sessions) for April, I saw a significant peak around half April:

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The problem with engineers...

Today, I've read an article in the New York Times, entitled Heartbleed Highlights a Contradiction in the Web:

Five years ago, Steve Marquess, then a technology consultant for the Defense Department, was struck by the contradiction that OpenSSL was "ubiquitous," yet no one working on the code was making any money. When he met Dr. Henson, Mr. Marquess said, Dr. Henson was working on OpenSSL code full time and "starving."
So Mr. Marquess started the OpenSSL Software Foundation to help programmers like Dr. Henson make money by consulting for government agencies and companies that were using the code. It also takes in some minimal donations, he said.
Over the last five years, the foundation has never made more than $1 million in commercial contracting revenue a year. This does not go very far in paying for the programmers’ work, Mr. Marquess said.

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My reputation

Heartbleed, an ASL business model failure?

The ancient Romans brought us many ingenious inventions. The Roman civilization had the potential to start an industrial revolution, but eventually this revolution never happened. What went wrong? One of the important inhibiting factors was the existence of slavery: why invent machines when a free source of work force is ubiquitous?

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OSCON cover-up

A Couple of months ago, I submitted the follow proposal for a 40-minute conference session to OSCON:

In 2007, Dries Buytaert (Drupal) and Bruno Lowagie (iText) had a dinner meeting in Antwerp, discussing how to create a business for their open source project. In 2008, Dries founded Acquia and Bruno founded 1T3XT. 5 years later, Acquia was ranked #2 in Deloitte's Technology Fast 500 in the US; iText was #10 in the Benelux Fast 50. In his talk, Bruno will confide the key secrets of this success.

This was the full Abstract:

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Google+

See also Bruno's profile on Google+